Because my world would be a Wonderland




Fanatic.
Girl.
Twenty-something.
Seattle.
Obsessed with a boyband, television shows and stories.
I should probably mention this blog is NOT spoiler free.

fabulouslyfreespirited:

If you deliberately seek out any of these images, you are directly participating in the violation not just of numerous women’s privacy but also of their bodies.
In what’s being called the biggest celebrity hacking incident in internet history, more than 100 female celebrities have had their private nude images stolen and published online. The bulk of the images posted have been officially confirmed as belonging to Jennifer Lawrence, but a complete list of victims’ names - including Krysten Ritter, Kate Upton, Mary Elizabeth Winstead, Rihanna, Brie Larson and Kirsten Dunst - has been subsequently published. (Link does not contain pictures, only names.)
The images were first uploaded by an anonymous member of the underground internet sewer known as 4chan and have since been enthusiastically shared across platforms like Reddit and Twitter. A representative for Lawrence has confirmed the images are real, condemning the theft of them as a “flagrant violation of privacy” and adding that “The authorities have been contacted and will prosecute anyone who posts the stolen photos.”
There are a few different issues that a criminal act like this brings up, but before I get into them it’s necessary to make one thing clear: If you deliberately seek out any of these images, you are directly participating in the violation not just of numerous women’s privacy but also of their bodies. These images - which I have not seen and which I will not look for - are intimate, private moments belonging only to the people who appear in them and who they have invited to see them. To have those moments stolen and broadcast to the world is an egregious act of psychic violence which constitutes a form of assault.
The people sharing these images are perpetuating an ongoing assault. The people gleefully looking at them are witnessing and enjoying an ongoing assault. When you have been asked by victims of a crime like this not to exacerbate the pain of that crime and you continue to do so anyway, you are consciously deciding that your enjoyment, your rights and perhaps even just your curiosity are more important than the safety and dignity of the people you’re exploiting.
That out of the way, let’s get a few other things straight.
1. This is not a ‘scandal’
It’s a crime, and we should be discussing it as such. Some media outlets are salaciously reporting it otherwise, as if the illegal violation of privacy involving intimate images is little more than subject for gossip. When associated with sex, the word ‘scandal’ has been typically interpreted as something that assigns responsibility to all parties involved, a consensual act unfortunately discovered and for which everyone owes an explanation or apology. Remember when private nude photos of Vanessa Hudgens (whose name also appears on the list of victims) were leaked online and Disney forced her to publicly apologise for her “lapse in judgment” and hoped she had “learned a valuable lesson”? Never mind that Hudgens was an adult and a victim of privacy violation - the ‘scandal’ was painted as something for which she owed her fans an apology. Which leads us to:
2. These women do not ‘only have themselves to blame’
While depressing, it’s sadly unsurprising to see some people arguing that Lawrence et al brought this on themselves. Part of living in a rape culture is the ongoing expectation that women are responsible for protecting themselves from abuse, and that means avoiding behaviour which might be later ‘exploited’ by the people who are conveniently never held to account for their actions. But women are entitled to consensually engage in their sexuality any way they see fit. If that involves taking nude self portraits for the enjoyment of themselves or consciously selected others, that’s their prerogative.
Victims of crime do not have an obligation to accept dual responsibility for that crime. Women who take nude photographs of themselves are not committing a criminal act, and they shouldn’t ‘expect’ to become victims to one, as actress Mary E. Winstead pointed out on Twitter. 
Sending a photograph of your breasts to one person isn’t consenting to having the whole world see those breasts, just as consenting to sex with one person isn’t the same as giving permission for everyone else to fu*k you. Victim blaming isn’t okay, even if it does give you a private thrill to humiliate the female victims of sexual exploitation.
3. It doesn’t matter that ‘damn, she looks good and should own it!’
Stealing and sharing the private photographs of women doesn’t become less of a crime just because you approve them for fapping activity. I’m sure many of the women on this list are confident of their sexual attractiveness. It doesn’t mean they don’t value their privacy or shouldn’t expect to enjoy the same rights to it as everyone else. It also doesn’t mean they want strangers sweating over their images. That line of thinking comes from the same school which instructs women to either ignore of welcome sexual harassment when it’s seemingly ‘positive’ in its sentiments.
None of these women are likely to give a shit that you think their bodies are ‘tight, damn’. Despite what society reinforces to us about the public ownership of women’s bodies, we are not entitled to co-opt and objectify them just because we think we can defend it as a compliment.
I will not be seeking out these images out and I urge everyone else to avoid doing the same. I hope that all the women who have been victimised here are being appropriately supported by the authorities and their network of friends. And I hope sincerely that more people take a stand against this kind of behaviour.
Because this incident aside, it strikes me as deeply ironic that we will vehemently protest a free Facebook messenger app because we’re outraged at reports that it can access our phone’s numbers, and yet turn around and excuse the serving up of women’s bodies for our own pleasure. Our appreciation is no less disgusting just because it’s accompanied by the sound of one hand clapping.

thinksquad:

Police officers in Ferguson, Missouri, have begun wearing body cameras after weeks of unrest over the shooting death of an unarmed black teen by a white officer and sharply differing accounts of the incident, officials said on Sunday.

Michael Brown, 18, was shot multiple times by Ferguson Police Officer Darren Wilson on Aug. 9, sparking nearly three weeks of angry protests in the St. Louis suburb and drawing global attention to race relations in the United States.

Law enforcement and witnesses gave differing accounts of what transpired before Brown was shot, with police saying the teen had struggled with the officer. Witnesses say Brown held up his hands and was surrendering when he was shot multiple times in the head and chest.

The discrepancy has revived calls for officers across the county to be outfitted with body cameras to help capture an accurate record of police-involved incidents.

http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/09/01/us-usa-missouri-shooting-idUSKBN0GW13M20140901

thinksquad:

Police officers in Ferguson, Missouri, have begun wearing body cameras after weeks of unrest over the shooting death of an unarmed black teen by a white officer and sharply differing accounts of the incident, officials said on Sunday.

Michael Brown, 18, was shot multiple times by Ferguson Police Officer Darren Wilson on Aug. 9, sparking nearly three weeks of angry protests in the St. Louis suburb and drawing global attention to race relations in the United States.

Law enforcement and witnesses gave differing accounts of what transpired before Brown was shot, with police saying the teen had struggled with the officer. Witnesses say Brown held up his hands and was surrendering when he was shot multiple times in the head and chest.

The discrepancy has revived calls for officers across the county to be outfitted with body cameras to help capture an accurate record of police-involved incidents.

http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/09/01/us-usa-missouri-shooting-idUSKBN0GW13M20140901


sergeantjerkbarnes:

can we please discuss what the fuck is wrong with pennsylvania

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and finally

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azogthekingofflowers:

221cbakerstreet:

Thorin’s motivations in The Hobbit movie: deep, meaningful destiny to reclaim ancestral homeland

Thorin’s motivations in The Hobbit book: 

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  (via sauronsnipple)


(Source: mileycyrauhs)


Chris Pratt and Dylan Prunty Recite Lines from “The LEGO Movie”

(Source: markoruffalo)


iwriteaboutfeminism:

Saturday morning, over 1,000 people march for justice for Michael Brown. 

August 30th.


Class and Harry Potter

blasphemousprophet:

"Quidditch is a rich man’s sport: like polo, in which the expense of horses limits participation to those with money or those sponsored by money, Quidditch players on old brooms can never hope to compete with those in possession of the latest technological marvels. "
-Crowning the King by Sarah Mendlesohn

The most interesting thing about Harry Potter is that it initially appears to be a fairy tale in which troubled boy finds his place in the world and lives happily ever after. What it actually amounts to is lonely supposedly lower class boy discovers he is actually one of the aristocratic elite and spends the rest of the series enjoying the moral virtue afforded to the very poor while also gliding through the doors that are only open to the very wealthy.

Harry is a member of the privileged upper class, just like Draco Malfoy. He proves himself to be a mediocre wizard time and time again (incompetent in potions class, falling behind in classes, etc), while Hermione is the smartest witch of the year and Ron is not considered distinguished enough to try for any specific title, being of the lower class. Harry, unlike the typical scrappy orphan boy, is constantly receiving gifts to ease his way. Harry receives the invisibility cloak, the Marauder’s Map, a preternatural ability to cast a Patronus, Quidditch ability from his father, and a part of Voldemort within him that allows him to fight the Dark Wizard. There is not much personal choice implied in all of this. Harry is the Chosen One, respected for something he did before he could talk, something he barely remembers, whose prestige will carry him through life. (Interesting that when others receive or give out gifts it is not judged the same way, such as when Malfoy gives his entire team of fellow Slytherins new brooms this is unanimously condemned as cheating but when Harry receives an expensive new broom out of the blue no one questions it, though he will undoubtedly exceed the speed of the other Seekers. Furthermore, when Slytherin rightfully wins the House Cup at the end of Year 1, Dumbledore fixes the match to Gryffindor’s benefit, an act that if reversed would have been protested on all sides.) 


Harry also has the exceedingly loyal Ron and the brilliant Hermione tagging along (another unflattering parallel to Malfoy’s sidekicks Crabbe and Goyle, who also look to Draco for their next move, rarely displaying any agency of their own) and Hagrid and Dobby (both troublingly infantilized and presented as ‘lower class,’ lacking intelligence and class, showing Harry’s brave tolerance in accepting them) and Sirius, Lupin, Dumbledore and even Snape, etc. Unlike the typical orphan hero, who must discovery the truth on his own, Harry has an entourage of helpers to assist him in his every move.

Hermione transcends the rigorous boundaries of class placed in the books (see narrator mocking the Malfoys’ pride at their pureblood status and then rushing to add that the Weasleys and Potters were some of the oldest magical families there were) by being a part of that elusive middle class. Hermione’s parents are dentists, they can go take Hermione traveling in the summertime, Hermione is comfortable purchasing her own textbooks and the like, but nowhere in the text is there any indication of her being wealthy. This would explain Ron’s implied resentment towards her, explaining it in terms of the lower class being jealous of the potentially for upward mobility the middle class has and the opportunities they are given. Hermione becomes attractive to the boys only after having plastic surgery, not an opportunity usually afforded to the lower class in the Muggle world and Victor Krum, the only adolescent in the book whose level of fame equals Harry’s, and thus the only male whose validation of her physically would stick, accompanying her to the Yule Ball. All of these things make Hermione much closer to the aristocracy than Ron is. As a woman in the wizarding world, intelligence seems to receive mockery but beauty allows one the innate ability to move in circles beyond one’s birth status.

This is why Ron rarely misses an opportunity to correct or criticize Hermione and her lack of wizarding knowledge (having grown up Muggle); Ron is looking for any chance he can get to prove himself worthy to Hermione, who is closer to him in status than the unimpeachably high class Harry, whom Ron rarely argues with. This is why Ron chooses to accuse Hermione at the Yule Ball of betrayal (unlike Harry, who admires Hermione’s makeover at the Yule Ball and thus validates her superficially as Krum did, both of them having the social authority to do so). This is actually the cruelest insult Ron can think of, implying that Harry Potter first made Hermione respected and now she is changing allegiances to another famous, aristocratic young man and turning her back on Harry, who allowed her to move up in status along with him. Ron, whose family is known for their poverty (hand me down robes, must be a Weasley) cannot even validate Hermione even if he were so inclined because he is too socially inferior for his opinion to matter. All he can do is attempt to shatter Hermione’s bubble of happiness and social acceptance with the harsh darkness of reality.

This also explains the trio’s attitude towards the house elves: Ron, being lower class, enjoys the pleasures of having a house elf when he can (ie whenever he is at Hogwarts), Harry in his upper class status is scarcely aware of the house elves because he is accustomed to that lifestyle (since the adoration he received in Year 1 and his discovery of his heritage and Gringotts, etc.) and therefore performs the symbolic (and self serving) act of freeing a single house elf (who will then accept Harry as his new master in everything but name, arguably a strategic move on Harry’s part, or a rare moment of sympathy for those with less but regardless this action is not repeated with Kreacher, Harry’s own property.) Hermione, as a member of the middle class, with enough money to pay for household help and enough time to focus on social awareness, is understandably the most liberal, practical and objective of the bunch, creating S.P.E.W. and attempting to make a difference. Hermione’s social radicalism is ridiculed by most for attempting to change the status quo of the deceptively rigid socioeconomic classes of the wizarding world.

Harry is a legacy at Hogwarts. There is an unflattering parallel between the way the Dursleys fawn over Dudley and the wizarding world fawns over Harry. Harry is naturally gifted, unlike Hermione who must work to be the smartest, and Ron who was raised in the Wizarding World. Harry is cozily ensconced in his wealth, occasionally pausing to feel discomfort but for the most part disregarding it as a fact of his existence. Dumbledore, like Harry, is renown for his wisdom but displays very little of it in practice, choosing instead to characterize himself as a quirky old man who loves sweets. As a member of the aristocracy, Dumbledore is permitted to do this while still retaining the respect of his peers. Think of Kate Middleton designing a clothing that is objectively terrible. This information would not matter because of who she is wed to. There is a safety the upper class enjoy that allows them greater freedom in exploration, discovery and making mistakes.

The wizarding world is not a fairy tale. Pull aside the velvet curtain and you’ll find thousands of slaves sentenced to clean up after the students for life. Step outside of Hogwarts and you’ll see magical creatures criticized and discriminated against. Go to Diagon Alley and prepare to see the brutality of class separation in action. (See Hagrid, member of the lower class, who automatically takes Harry to Madame Pomfrey’s to get fitted for robes, the same location that the wealthy Malfoys buy their son’s garments, but stays outside the shop the whole time, fully aware of the difference between his status and Harry’s.) Pop back inside Hogwarts and witness deeply inbred interhouse prejudice. The wizarding world is a mess that Harry floats above, Hermione wades through and Ron sinks under. No wonder Ron quit being an Auror (a respectable job) to work in his brother’s candy shop (that Harry paid for); it’s likely the only place he felt he belonged.

And therein lies the message of Harry Potter: the wizarding world parallels our own in that it has nearly destroyed itself, but for all the Malfoy/Dumbledore/Harrys out there, there is a Hermione, naively, earnestly attempting to make a difference. And to do that would require some serious magic.


fuckyeahhayleywilliams:

thefirehaired:

last hope is such an incredible song because despite the religious content on it you can relate to it so strongly and it makes your soul shiver and ugh

One of the reasons I relate to it IS the religious themes, but maybe I’m in the minority.

You’re not the only one.


micdotcom:

11 ways to solve rape better than nail polish

The more we depend on women to prevent rape, the easier it is to blame them when it happens to them. Here’s a look at the well-documented ways we can actually stop rape. Maybe it’s time we invest a little more time and resources into implementing them before we send gallons of nail polish to colleges across the country.

Read the full list | Follow micdotcom


queertodaygonetomorrow:

atane:

wristxrocket:

dear-drifter:

lilightfoot:

Remember.

his life was totally in danger.

^^^^

True story; this officer (John Pike) got a settlement of $38,000 because he said he got depressed after pepper spraying these kids. Oh, the depression wasn’t for feeling remorseful for pepper spraying a bunch of college kids peacefully protesting. He got depressed because he said since the media kept playing the video of him pepper spraying peaceful kids without cause, he got threats and didn’t feel safe. He didn’t feel safe. I’m not making that up. This motherfucker collected nearly 40 grand on worker’s comp after assaulting a bunch of college kids.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/10/23/pepper-spray-cop-settlement_n_4152147.html

queertodaygonetomorrow:

atane:

wristxrocket:

dear-drifter:

lilightfoot:

Remember.

his life was totally in danger.

^^^^

True story; this officer (John Pike) got a settlement of $38,000 because he said he got depressed after pepper spraying these kids. Oh, the depression wasn’t for feeling remorseful for pepper spraying a bunch of college kids peacefully protesting. He got depressed because he said since the media kept playing the video of him pepper spraying peaceful kids without cause, he got threats and didn’t feel safe. He didn’t feel safe. I’m not making that up. This motherfucker collected nearly 40 grand on worker’s comp after assaulting a bunch of college kids.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/10/23/pepper-spray-cop-settlement_n_4152147.html

(Source: kropotkindersurprise)


agentsoftheimpala:

I hope one day to do anything with as much confidence as Aaron Tveit’s entrance in “One Day More” at the Oscars

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"In what way was Guardians sexist?"

acciobenedictcumberbatch:

gingerhaze:

under the cut for spoilers and probably unpopular opinions

Read More

I actually agree with this! I think gamora was an awesome feminist character but the movie as a whole sorta failed for me in terms of sexism. The whore joke in particular at first, but (as a recent post I just reblogged mentioned) then i realized that since he only does speak literally, he would only have gotten it from someone at the prison or something, because there’s otherwise no way for him to think she’s an actual whore. It’s just horrible that this got one of the biggest laughs in the whole movie - alongside the ableist jokes that Rocket made, which made the theater crack up but just made me groan.


”Becoming fearless isn’t the point. That’s impossible. It’s learning how to control your fear, and how to be free from it.”

(Source: zoeysbenson)


(Source: rodrigoseaburre)